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The 5 Most Amazing Climbing Plants for your Pergola



The nice weather is finally here! Outdoor barbecues, family events and picnics are right around the corner. This means time to decorate your backyard. Creating a nice focal piece for all your friends and family to see.  Each individual climbing plant gives a different look but is something people will be talking about. Having so many different types will help for you to express your personality. Here are the five best climbing plants for your pergola.

The first one is Honeysuckle. It is a beautiful orange flower. It has an extremely huge vine that would cover any pergola. It also tends to have a longing fragrance and the smell seems to multiple when the sun sets. Leaving your backyard smelling incredible. The honeysuckle seems to have over 180 different species, and all have big vines and grow at crazy rates.

The next type of climbing plant that would be great for your pergola is the classic rose. It tends to be the favorite for most gardeners. These roses harvest a feeling of tranquility, romance and happiness. Like the honeysuckle the roses also come in a lot of different climbing styles.

Third we have ivy. Ivy is best for pergolas that tend to be more in the shade. Ivy is great in all types of weather. It gives off a really pretty green color. Extremely low maintenance, and like the others it also comes in a variety.


The Tropical Bleeding Heart is another amazing climbing plant for your pergola.  It originated in Western Africa and is supposed to resemble a bleeding heart. This particular climbing plant does very well in the heat and warmth. It is so pretty and if you’re looking for something different for your pergola, this is the one for you.

Lastly, we have my favorite the grape vine. This is one of the best climbing plants for any pergola. The grapevine can be grown in a lot of different climates. It is native to a couple places such as the Mediterranean, Central Asia, America, and South West Asia. The grape vine produces a lot of shade for your pergola. It also provides a warm sitting place. Perfect for those cool summer nights.

These five amazing climbing plants will help to decorate your backyard for all the nice weather coming. They also have many other benefits, besides their beauty. This is something great to add to your backyard for the upcoming summer season. 

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